Bos Angkunh

Bos Angkunh is a popular Khmer traditional game played especially during Khmer New Year at villages, or schools, especially at the pagodas. Angkunh is called after one kind of dried fruit from a climbing plant in Cambodia. Normally, this game could help maintain people's mental and physical dexterity. This game is an entertainment, which assists people coordinating their hands and eyes, and it also enhances the concentration of people.

Ok Chaktrong

Khmer Chess has been called in several names such as Ok / Ouk, Ok Chaktrang, Chaktrang, Chhoeu Trang. The name Ok is because each party's purpose is to attack the Sdach in order to win, and when one is about to attack the king, they will say Ok.

Sey Game

Sey Game has been the most popular folk traditional game for men of all ages since ancient times to present-day. It is most commonly played in open spaces in the late afternoon or in pagodas during Khmer New Year and other Festivals.

Krama (Khmer Scarf)

Kramar is a sturdy traditional Cambodian garment and signifies the Khmer cultural identity with many daily-life uses and ornate by all segments and religions.

Kouprey (Wild Ox): The National Mammal of Cambodia

The Koupreys “Grey ox” is a little-known, forest dwelling, wild bovine species from Southeast Asia. Koupreys is a species of mammal that is identified as a symbol for the Cambodian nation and it is a rare animal in the world.

Tror Yorng (Giant Ibis): The National Bird of Cambodia

Giant Ibis (Tror Yorng) is a species of bird that is identified as a symbol for the Cambodian nation. The adults have overall dark grayish-brown plumage with a naked, greyish head and upper neck. There are dark bands across the back of the head and shoulder area and the pale silvery-grey wing tips also have black crossbars. The beak is yellowish-brown, the legs are orange, and the eyes are dark red. This is the largest of the world’s ibises. Adults are reportedly 102-106 cm long, with an upright standing height of up to 100 cm and are estimated to weigh about 4.2 kg.

Royal Turtle: The National Reptile of Cambodia

Royal Turtle is reptile that represents of Khmer culture and also known as "Arn Derk SorSai" or "Arn Derk Loung" in Khmer, as well as the English name Royal Turtle and the scientific name "Batagur baska". It has white eyes, straight up nose-shaped, 60 cm length black or grey shell, and only four toes which differ from general turtle with five toes as human. Its front legs are big and have a contiguous skin similar to duck leg. In ancient times, it had a history protected by a royal decree and considered it as the royal dynasty property in Cambodia.

Chek Pong Moin (Musa Aromatic): The National Fruit of Cambodia

The National fruit of Cambodia is Chicken egg banana. The banana is regarded as the national fruit of Cambodia among the most other valuable plants and provides many benefits to society same as a palm tree and Rumdoul flower.

Giant Mekong Barb: The National Fish of Cambodia

Giant barb or Trei Kol Raing is the largest species of cyprinid in the world. These migratory fish are found only in the Mae Klong, Mekong, and Chao Phraya river basins in Indochina. It has declined drastically due to habitat loss and overfishing, and it is now considered critically endangered. 

Palm Tree (Borassus flabellifer): The National Tree of Cambodia

Palm Tree is a kind of plant that has widely grown in Cambodia since long time ago. Palm tree, commonly known as Borassus flabellifer in scientific name and in Khmer called “Tnaot”, is native to the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, including Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Lao, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.  

Independence Monument

Erect in 1955, the Independence Monument symbolizes Cambodian Independence gained from French colonialism in 1953. It stands on the intersection of Norodom Boulevard and Sihanouk Boulevard in the center of the city.

Wat Phnom

The Wat Phnom Temple is the most significant of all the temples in Phnom Penh. The temple has a close-knitted relationship to the capital city. This in effect is a sanctuary founded by Daun Penh (Grandma Penh), a wealthy widow who in 1372, retrieved from a river a log with five Buddha statues in it and ordered to elevate a piece of her property on which build a temple to house the statues. The 27 meters high man-made hill became known as Wat Phnom.