Robam Kuos Traloak (Coconut Dance)

Robam Kous Trolaok (Coconut Shell Dance) has been a legacy of Khmer people for a long time. This traditional folk dance was originated from Romeas Hek district in Svay Rieng Province. This Dance is performed during the wedding ceremony (Groom Procession) and other festivals for cheering the atmosphere.

Central Market (Psar Thom Thmei)

The vibrant capital is filled with far more color and culture, and some of the best places to witness the unmatched charm of the city are at its traditional markets. There should be plenty of time to go shopping in many markets. The Pksar Thom Thmei or the Central Market erected in Art Deco in 1930 (1935-1937) is a Phnom Penh landmark.

Angkor Wat

In the Angkorean era, the ancient Khmer Kingdom dominated most of present Southeast Asia from 800 to 1430 AD. The Angkor Complex is the soul of Khmer people (approximately 90% of Cambodia Population). Inside the Angkor-complex area consist of 200 monuments, which spread over an area of 400 square kilometers. There are various Khmer temples were built between the 7th and 13th centuries by Khmer kings when the Khmer civilization was at its height of the extraordinary creativity. The Angkor architecture serves as the evidence of the strong Khmer religious beliefs - Hinduism and Buddhism. And, the most popular temples in the Angkor area are Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom, Bayon, Baphuon, Phimeanakas, Ta Keo, Ta Prohm, Banteay Kdei, Pré Roup, East Mebon, Kravan, Preah Khan, Neak Poan, Banteay Srey, Rolous Group, etc.

Khmer Wrestling (Boak Cham Bab)

Baok Chambab is Cambodian traditional wrestling; a sport in which two opponents try to pin (hold) each other’s back to the ground. It has been practiced as far back as the Angkor period and is depicted on the bas-relief of the certain temple. The earliest form of Khmer traditional wrestling was called Maloyuth. Maloyuth was created in 788 A.D. by Brahmin Timu. It evolved to the current form of wrestling, Bok Cham Bab, in the 8th century. Although predominantly a male sport today, Khmer wrestling was once practiced by both sexes as female wrestlers are also displayed on the Banteay Srei temple.

Temple Zone of Sambor Prei Kuk Archaeological Site of Ancient Ishanapura

The archaeological site of Sambor Prei Kuk, “the temple in the richness of the forest” in the Khmer language, has been identified as Ishanapura, the capital of the Chenla Empire (Chenla Kingdom) that flourished in the late 6th and early 7th till 9th centuries CE. It is located in Kampong Thom Province, 30 km (19 miles) north of Stueng Sen city, 176 km (109 miles) east of Angkor and 206 (128 miles) north of Phnom Penh.

Bokator

Bokator, known formally as Labokator, is a Khmer material art form that involves close hand-to-hand combat, ground techniques, and weapons. Bokator is one of the earliest Khmer material art and second in age only to the Mon-Khmer style of Yuthakun Khom. Moreover, this martial art is said to be the close quarter combat system used by the armies during the Angkor era. Practitioners are trained to strike with knees, elbows, hands feet, and even the head. Short sticks are commonly used as a weapon.

Banteay Srei Temple

Banteay Srei temple is a 10th-century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of  Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art.

Preah Vihea Temple

The Preah Vihear temple is a Khmer temple located spectacularly atop Pey Tadi, slightly east of the midsection of the mountain range of the Dangrek, being in Svay Chrum village, Kan Tout commune, Choam Khsant district, in the Preah Vihear province of northern Cambodia. It is also perched on the edge of a giant cliff, 525-meter (1720 ft) above the Cambodian plain and 625-meter (2051ft) above sea level. Lying out on an 800-meter north-south axis, the Preah Vihear complex has a single imposing approach, leading up through a series of five Gopura (towered entrance pavilions) connected by causeways and 120-meter-long steps. The temple gives its name to Cambodia’s Preah Vihear province and is 140km from Angkor Wat; approximately 460 km from Phnom Penh. 

Lakhon Bassac

Khmer visual art forms have different names. Some forms have taken names from any musical instrument or musical orchestra such as Yike theatre or Mahori theater, etc. But, other forms have taken over the name of the most popular artist such as Yike theater.

Robam Jun Por (Blessing Dance)

Robam Choun Por (Blessing Dance) is traditionally performed at the beginning of a ceremony to greet, bless, and offer good wishes to the audience. Khmer, as a nation, present their identity with pleasant, politeness, and honesty and prefer to develop friendship and building peace. Guests and relatives are welcomed with cordial hospitality. The Blessing Dance is a masterpiece of Her Majesty the Queen Sisowath Kosamak Nearyrath who created this dance to reflect the pleasant character of Khmer nation.

Apsara Dance

There are many classical dance forms in Cambodia, of which a highly stylized art form was once confined mainly to the courts of the royal palace and performed mainly by females. Known formally in Khmer as Robam Apsara, the dancers of this classical form are often referred to as Apsara dancers. Apsara Dance is one of many dances in the Khmer Classical Dance. This dance invented in the mid-20th Century by the Royal Ballet of Cambodia, under the patronage of Queen Sisowat Kosamak. This dance form was first introduced to foreign countries and best known during the 1960s as the Khmer Royal Ballet. The first royal ballerina was Princess Norodom Sihanuk.

Bayon Temple

Bayon temple is a well-known and richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor area in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII, the Bayon stands at the center of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom. Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences.